A possible Saracen? Alfred (Abraham) Flatau

Of all the potential Saracens we have uncovered so far I have to admit Alfred/Abraham Flatau is one of the most intriguing, and thus a personal favourite. Born in 1875 in the East End to Barnett and Priscilla, Abraham as he was then known, was part of the vibrant Jewish community that used to dominate…

WJ Brown & the difficulties of a common name

One of great difficulties in locating our fallen Saracens is those players with a relatively common name. Whilst Capellis and Flatau’s are a relatively exclusive clan, narrowing down the options on Evans, Brown and Williams is a somewhat taller order. Take for example WJ Brown, who appears in our team photo, seated on the ground…

Discovering your own relative: At the National Archives

At the heart of the Saracens WW1 project, and indeed almost any genealogy projects, has always laid the intention to inspire others to research into their own family backgrounds. For us it is especially crucial, relying as we do often on family photos and stories to corroborate our suspicions about whether a player was indeed…

1916: A most terrible year

Known to posterity as the bloodiest year of the war, 1916 earns this sobriquet having seen the great battles of attrition at Verdun and the Somme, the sparks of a civil war brewing within Britain during the Dublin ‘Easter Rising,’ and the introduction of conscription for the first time within Britain. All notions of romanticism…

The Nomads Vs The Exiles

The history of the Saracens VS London Irish fixture goes right back to the first year of the founding of the Irish exiles club. Formed in 1898 following the lead set by the London Scottish and Welsh sides, Saracens were amongst the first sides to play Irish on the 12th of November. The uninspiring 0-0…